This profile is from a federated server and may be incomplete. Browse more on the original instance.

leopold, (edited )

A product of its time. KDE 2 released in 2000 and this is a pre-release screenshot of a non-default theme. The default KDE 2 theme looked like this. It was competing with the likes of Windows Me, Mac OS 9 and GNOME 1.

leopold, (edited )

Looks like Motif with its trademark terrible contrast (black text on dark grey, very accessible) and a lame marble texture slapped on top of it. Also that button in the bottom left corner has like zero margins. Very 2000 overall. Not something I’d ever want to use, tho. To be fair, the default theme KDE 2 ended up using was significantly better.

leopold,

Activities do a lot more. Virtual desktops are purely a window management feature. They contain windows and very little else. Activities can have different, panels, wallpapers, desktop icons, etc.

leopold,

KDE Non-LInear Video Editor. Or Kool Desktop Environment Non-LInear Video Editor, if you will.

AUA: We are the Plasma dev team. Ask Us Anything about Plasma 6, gear 24.02, Frameworks 6 and everything else in the upcoming Megarelease.

David, Nate, Josh, Marco, Carl, and Niccolò are here ready to answer all your questions on Plasma (all versions), Gear, Frameworks, Wayland (and how it affects KDE’s software), and everything in between....

leopold,

offtopic, but why is this comment yellow? never seen that before.

EDIT: Oh wait, I think it’s to mark unread comments. Haven’t seen that before. Must be a new thing.

leopold,

LibreOffice uses its own toolkit called VCL which uses a number back-ends to render using native toolkits on all platforms, similar in concept to WxWidgets. I don’t know if the way VCL works allows Qt6 fractional scaling to just work, but a Qt6/KF6 back-end already exists and can be forced by setting SAL_USE_VCLPLUGIN=qt6 or SAL_USE_VCLPLUGIN=kf6, so you should be able to try it out right now.

leopold,

Maui confuses me. The Plasma Mobile homepage features Index, Pix and Vvave prominently. Additionally, those three and Nota are featured on apps.kde.org and the git repositories for all Maui applications are hosted on KDE’s GitLab at invent.kde.org/maui. Index in particular is very important for KDE, since it’s the only mobile-friendly file manager Plasma Mobile has. The Maui blog is also aggregated on Planet KDE. So clearly Maui is very closely related to KDE.

However, Maui Shell is hosted on Nitrux’s GitHub, not KDE. Maui apps also don’t use a lot of standard KDE infrastructure like bugs.kde.org. Plus, the elephant in the room, Maui apps have a totally different HIG from the rest of KDE. Mauikit apps are convergent, use CSD and force the standard Maui theme. They always use hamburger menus over menubars and rarely use more than one window. Apps focus on simple interfaces and simple feature sets. Some of these things, such as convergence, preference for hamburger menus and single window interfaces are also found in some Kirigami applications, but in Maui it’s universal. It feels like a Qt version of GNOME much more than it feels KDE. Combine Maui Shell with Maui applications and you end up with a desktop environment which has nothing in common with KDE’s flagship Plasma. So what’s Maui? How is it related to KDE? I don’t get it.

leopold,

I just use the web client

leopold, (edited )

Desktop environments are always developed alongside a set of applications, which is what differentiates them from simple desktop shells. These applications aren’t exclusive to the desktops they were made for, they’re simply designed to fit their aesthetic and design philosophy to offer a more consistent experience. Most desktop environments have a fairly limited set of applications, covering mostly the essentials. The most commonly found types are terminals, file managers, settings, image viewers, media players, text editors, screenshot apps and software centers.

GNOME and KDE are the exceptions, by virtue of being much larger than all other desktops. Both maintain a very extensive set of applications with a wide range of purposes, which tend to be widely used regardless of desktops. GNOME’s Evolution and KDE’s Kdenlive for instance are among the most popular apps on Linux, since they’re among the best apps to use to fulfill their respective purposes (PIM and video editing).

leopold, (edited )

Every Linux distribution packages the dependencies for the software they distribute and will automatically install when needed. If you’re trying to install GNOME software on KDE and you don’t have the necessary GNOME dependencies installed, the package manager will just install them for you. This is why using applications cross-desktop isn’t something the average user has to worry about. It should just work.

leopold,

glad kcalc is finally becoming usable

leopold,

I remember trying just about every GUI calculator I could find and trying to get one I could actually tolerate. Any calculator which pointlessly hid what you’d written from you every time you added an operator like KCalc did was automatically out, which disqualified a surprisingly and disappointingly large amount of calculators. Any calculator without a standard skeuomorphic interface was also out, because I didn’t feel like relearning how to use a calculator.

I used GNOME calculator for a while, but switched away because I found the interface for programmer mode to be hella confusing when I really just wanted to have hexadecimal and binary modes. I also used Uno Calculator for a while, a direct port of the Windows 10 calculator, but the port was a bit rough and fonts didn’t work so well, otherwise it would’ve been perfect. I finally settled on Deepin Calculator. A bit basic and completely unthemable beyond switching between dark and light themes, but it was very easy to use and had all the functionality I needed. I can’t for the life of me remember why I didn’t just go with Qalculate!. I know for a fact I tried it and it seems like it would’ve been perfect. I’ll probably just be using KCalc from now on, tho.

leopold,

twm and paperwm are two very different window managers

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • random
  • All magazines